The Finch Formerly Known As Gold

30 March 2003

Nominee for the Junior Realists League

As we all know, teenage girls fill up their sites with boys, music, complaints about the parental units, boys, school happenings, angst, blissful innocence, and boys.

Well, sometimes. I offer the following item (no discernible permalinks, scroll to 20 March) from Jillian, almost sixteen, in some small Indiana town:

[Y]ou can't deal with someone like Saddam by not doing anything, slapping him on the wrist, and he'll promise to be a good little boy and change his ways. It would be nice if it was that simple, but the world does not work like that. People are living in a dream world thinking that everyone is going to be peaceful and easy to get along with. Yeah, war sucks, but which is worse: a smaller amount of lives lost for a just cause or even more death if we let Saddam persecute his people and one day use his weapons of mass destruction on any country he chooses? Besides, Bush and the military leaders [know] what they're doing; we're not just bombing the hell out of Iraq and killing all kinds of Iraqi citizens. It's definitely more planned out and complicated than that. Bush is going to make this war end as quickly and with as little casualties as possible. It's a small price to pay for the sake of who knows how many lives in the future. What really saddens me is that here everyone is bitching about how stupid Bush is and how the war is stupid, whenever Bush is doing the best he can to protect these very same people, America, etc. At least give the man a little more respect than that.

Apart from the obvious question — there are standard antiwar types even in small Indiana towns? — there's a definite sense of "I am so tired of having to explain this to you over and over and over." It's not a feeling you have to be almost sixteen to understand or appreciate, either.

Posted at 9:11 PM to Political Science Fiction


Out of the mouths of babes, I always say. Her insight reminds me of a quote from James Otis' last speech to the Observers Club shortly before the Patriots took to the fields to fight a similar battle -- a battle for individual freedoms: "We fight, we die, all for a simple thing - so that a man can stand up. But what it's about,,you'll never really know."

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

(I've been on a much-needed hiatus from this contraption...many congrats on your second grand-offspring...PICS NOW!!

Posted by: vickie at 4:48 AM on 31 March 2003