The Finch Formerly Known As Gold

12 February 2004

Monorail!

Well, it hasn't gotten to that yet, but Oklahoma City's Metro Transit is getting ready to spend a million bucks or so on a feasibility study for a light-rail system.

This, mind you, while the city (connected to the usual conduit for federal funds) is getting ready to spend $350 million or so on a rerouting of Interstate 40 south of downtown which will trash five rail lines already in place.

I have my doubts about light rail in places as spread out as this — Oklahoma City covers over 600 square miles all by itself, and the suburbs will presumably want a piece of the action — but if we're seriously going to consider it as an option, ripping up rail lines for the sake of I-40 is utterly insane; not even Phil Hartman could sell a bill of goods that preposterous.

Posted at 11:05 AM to City Scene


I agree, it makes more sense in Dallas.

On another note, I think it'd be nice to have one in Norman (where I'm at) but that's just because I'm lazy. :)

Posted by: Matthew at 12:20 PM on 12 February 2004

Among those of us involved in the Transportation business, there's an old joke:

MONORAIL!
IT'S THE TRANSPORTATION MODE OF THE FUTURE!

AND IT ALWAYS WILL BE!

/f

Posted by: Fritz Schranck at 2:25 PM on 12 February 2004

A mule with a spinning wheel!

Heh..."mule."

Posted by: David at 9:16 PM on 12 February 2004

What a coincidence... That very Simpsons episode is about to start here in Tampa Bay syndication land.

Batman's a scientist.

Posted by: CT at 9:56 PM on 12 February 2004

Once upon a time, Oklahoma City and suburbs had a very extensive trolley and interurban rail system, which continued to operate (IIRC) until the 1950s. It ran from downtown OKC to Norman, El Reno, and Edmond, out to Springlake Park, and all over the city itself.

There's a book called When Oklahoma Took the Trolley, published in 1980, which details trolley, streetcar, and other electric rail lines which operated in Oklahoma. Tulsa's central library has a copy in their non-circulating Oklahoma history collection.

http://www.bookfinder.com/dir/i/When_Oklahoma_Took_the_Trolley/0916374351/

Posted by: Michael Bates at 10:51 PM on 12 February 2004


Why did they drop it?

I sure would like a better way of commuting to OKC than I35 or Sooner Road.

...and speaking of Sooner Rd. what's up with that speed limit, anyone?

Posted by: Matthew at 11:36 AM on 13 February 2004