Not quite e-nough

Some of the real-world financial aspects of publishing for the Kindle, from Rob O’Hara:

Amazon advertises that authors keep 70% of the proceeds from each eBook sale, but that only applies to books priced at $2.99 and above. For us 99-cent bottom feeders, it’s 35%. That means for each $0.99 electronic copy of Commodork I sell through Amazon, I only make 34 cents. Combine that with the fact that Paypal charges .35 per transaction, and you can quickly see I’m not exactly rolling in the dough on this endeavor. All I can do is “pray Lord Vader doesn’t alter the deal further.”

Accordingly, he’s raising the price of the Kindle version to $2.99, while simultaneously, he’s cutting the price of a non-DRMed PDF version from his Web site from $4.99 to $2.99, which leads to some musing on how to deal with aggrieved buyers who paid the higher price:

Option #4: Contact all the people that just bought Commodork for $0.99 on Amazon and ask them to Paypal $2 to the people that paid me $4.99 for the book.

For the record, I have Commodork in its actual dead-tree edition. Cost me something like $20.





1 comment

  1. Ric Locke »

    7 July 2011 · 10:07 pm

    That makes this a good place to thank you publicly for the good review of Temporary Duty, my book up on Amazon for the Kindle.

    After thinking for a bit, I put it up at $2.99, the minimum for the 70% royalty option. (Note that it isn’t really; they charge a “delivery cost” and a couple of other carrying charges, and reserve the right to sell it at 35% royalty under conditions I haven’t been able to determine.) At the time, I was wondering if I had a hundred or so friends, relatives, and other connections who might buy it, so as to get a nonzero result.

    Thanks to you, Instapundit, and a couple of others, I’m now well over 3500 copies sold, Kindle store rank under 200, and 25 days in the top 100 SF&F. On some updates it’s even ahead of Charles Stross’s new book, which gratifies me no end for reasons too obscure to relate. I’m too stupefied by the bizarreness of the situation to be truly happy about it.

    Regards,
    Ric

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