Downholstery

Some days it seems you just can’t reason with a dealership:

My 2005 TSX has only 20k miles on it, so there’s still 30k miles left on the warranty. A couple of weeks ago I took her in for what I thought was some minor warranty fixes. Little did I know…

The Service Manager refused to fix the split in the [seat] stitching because he claims:

  1. that I get into the car “wrong” (whatever that means). He claims that I brush against the side-bolster of the seat, and that this is not the correct way to get into the car. I asked where in the owners manual it describes the “correct” way to get into the car to no avail.
  2. that I wear the wrong kind of pants. Yes, you read that right. The guy told me that blue jeans tend to scuff the leather, and that I might not have this problem if I wore slacks. Apparently getting into the car with Levis is not considered “normal use” under the terms of the warranty.
  3. that I should have taken it back to the dealer who sold me the car (in Sacramento, about 80 miles away). Ya, I don’t get it, either. That’s not what the warranty says….

I suspect the rivets in one’s jeans are more hazardous to leather than mere denim itself would be, though I have no expertise in coefficients of fabric friction other than, you should pardon the expression, seat-of-the-pants estimates.

I did, however, pull out Gwendolyn’s manual to see what Infiniti had to say on the subject, which turns out to be nothing: unlike Acura, Infiniti, at least in 2000, did not see fit to exclude upholstery from warranty coverage. And after 95,000 miles, including about 7,000 miles so far under my decreasingly-fat arse, Gwendolyn’s leather seats are in excellent shape.

Mark Ashley, writing for Consumerist, suggests a solution: “Drive naked.” Um, not on leather, Marcus; besides, there’s always going to be someone who finds your lack of pants disturbing. (Solution to solution: throw a bath towel over the seat.)





1 comment

  1. Catherine »

    1 April 2007 · 10:08 pm

    Yeah, “warranty” is a code word that means there is coverage for things that *could* go wrong, but not for the stuff that does go wrong.

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