No, a fence intended

Municipalities in this state have always been fond of the process known as “fenceline annexation,” in which the town surrounds an otherwise unincorporated area by a narrow strip of land within the corporate limits, thereby blocking other towns from annexing the area themselves. The high, or low, point of this exercise came in 1999, when Seminole annexed a strip of land along the west side of OK 99 to the right-of-way of I-40, a strip approximately ten miles long and three feet wide, which drew a lawsuit; Seminole was eventually forced to back off, and the state started tightening the rules after that.

Which is not to say that the practice is obsolete or anything:

The Town of Slick has begun proceedings to create its own fenceline annexation in an effort to circumvent and nullify the City of Bristow’s annexation made this past March. At a press conference held Friday afternoon, Clayton McKinzie, the chairman of the Citizens Against Annexation announced that shortly after Norman attorney William Dill filed a class action law suit against the City of Bristow, it was discovered that there was a “hole” in Bristow’s legal description of its newly annexed lands, which left a physical gap in Bristow’s line. The fenceline annexation has been described by Bristow officials as a protective border around the unincorporated boundaries of the city to protect from annexation from outside entities. Officials say that the “fence line” would protect potential growth areas or areas where the city already has substantial investment, for example a new water line. According to the Citizens against Annexation, this is exactly what they want to prevent.

And water, not surprisingly in Oklahoma, even the relatively damp-ish eastern half, is the issue:

According to McKinzie, the CAA is concerned that the annexation makes it possible for Bristow to start drilling wells and pumping water out of the area which could affect the area’s water table. As a result, the CAA filed a class action lawsuit in April to stop Bristow’s annexation. It was then that the hole in the fence was discovered. Attorneys for the Town of Slick drew up their own version of a fenceline annexation, slipping their boundaries in through the hole in the Bristow fenceline and creating a line just inside the City of Bristow’s, essentially cutting Bristow out of its own annexation and nullifying its line.

They don’t call that town “Slick” for nothing.





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