Sweaty in Seattle

Parella Lewis of KCPQ, aka Q13 Fox (Seattle/Tacoma), presents a startling statistic:

Five. Whole. Days.

And the record for consecutive days with highs 90 degrees plus in Oklahoma City (again, per NWS)?

Seventy-one (June 23 – September 1, 1980 and June 1 – August 10, 2011).

Then again, it’s Rainier up there.

(Retweeted into my stream by Cameron Miquelon.)







10 comments »

  1. canadienne »

    12 July 2014 · 11:33 pm

    OMG, that is way too hot for too long. I assume people stay indoors in air conditioned spaces.

  2. CGHill »

    12 July 2014 · 11:40 pm

    You assume correctly. (This explains my $124 electric bill for the month, or most of it anyway.)

  3. Tatyana »

    13 July 2014 · 9:18 am

    No wonder you have insomnia.
    I sleep very briefly when my AC is on – and it’s a quiet new model; constant background noise enters my dreams in grotesque forms…
    Does central air buzz like window AC?

  4. CGHill »

    13 July 2014 · 11:52 am

    It’s louder, but the main source of noise is outside the house; inside you just hear increased airflow.

  5. fillyjonk »

    13 July 2014 · 1:28 pm

    Actually, the sound of an airconditioner, provided the fan doesn’t cycle off and on randomly, helps me sleep: it covers up the duallie trucks driving by on the street, the dogs barking, the idiots with boom cars who are SURE I am aching to hear rap music at 2 am….

    I’d have a lot less sympathy for those in the Pacific NW, but I’m willing to bet many of them don’t have a/c. I remember an absolutely miserable trip to Northern Michigan where it was up over 90 (and HUMID) and the hotel I was in didn’t have a/c. I didn’t so much sleep as I lay on the bed and sweated….

  6. canadienne »

    13 July 2014 · 2:37 pm

    Do you use the expression “It’s a DRY heat” in Oklahoma the way people on the Canadian prairies do? (There’s also the winter equivalent, “It’s a dry cold” when it’s -40).

    Fillyjonk’s experience in norther Michigan reminded me of those days in Toronto and environs when it is 35C/95F with a humidex that pushes the subjective temperature over 40C/104F.

    I remember quite a while ago one of your commenters doubted the windchill and humidex concepts. Spend a year in TO,buddy, and you will find out about both.

  7. CGHill »

    13 July 2014 · 2:57 pm

    Of late, it hasn’t been a dry heat: dew points have been in the upper 60s to middle 70s, a range from “somewhat sticky” to “Christ, this is like breathing broth.” When it gets up over 105 or so, it’s usually because we have southwest airflow, largely from the desert, so the additional effect of humidity is small; the record high here is 113°F, or 45°C, which didn’t feel any worse than it actually was. I leave the “dry-heat” remarks to the El Pasoans and the Phoenicians: they can make the claim more legitimately than we can.

    One year I spent a couple of days in Florida on a World Tour: the temperature never got above the low 90s, but the humidity never got below the middle 70s. I am told this is fairly typical for Orlando in July.

  8. Tatyana »

    13 July 2014 · 3:10 pm

    FJ, re; the outside noises and their transformation in sleep:

    “So she sat on, with closed eyes, and half believed herself in Wonderland, though she knew she had but to open them again, and all would change to dull reality—the grass would be only rustling in the wind, and the pool rippling to the waving of the reeds—the rattling teacups would change to tinkling sheep-bells, and the Queen’s shrill cries to the voice of the shepherd boy—and the sneeze of the baby, the shriek of the Gryphon, and all the other queer noises, would change (she knew) to the confused clamour of the busy farm-yard—while the lowing of the cattle in the distance would take the place of the Mock Turtle’s heavy sobs.”

  9. fillyjonk »

    13 July 2014 · 4:49 pm

    Yeah, mine aren’t so much tea parties as concerns that something really bad is happening right outside my front door.

  10. Charles Pergiel »

    14 July 2014 · 2:41 am

    Rainier. Ha. Ha, ha, ha. Ha!

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