A word to the sufficient

And sufficiency, in this context, refers to being able to sign NBA-sized checks, preferably wisely:

The machinations surrounding a star player’s free agency don’t start when his contract expires, or even in the final season of his contract. They start the year before, when everyone can see the end of the contract in the distance, and maximizing the star’s trade value becomes a pressing issue if that star is disgruntled.

There is no evidence Durant is disgruntled. Repeat: There is no evidence Durant is disgruntled. If the Durant / Russell Westbrook / Serge Ibaka three-man core stays healthy, Durant is living within a roster that could hit 60 wins in every season for at least the next five years. That is a tough situation to leave.

Of course, “stays healthy” is a theoretical construct at the moment. This season, at least, 60 wins may already be out of the question.

But you’re kidding yourself if you think the Thunder aren’t well into the process of thinking about Durant’s future, or that other teams aren’t lining up their cap sheets to make a run at him. It might be unpleasant to read and hear chatter about a thing that is 18 months away, and I do my best to focus on the actual NBA games during the NBA season. But this is reality.

Before that, though, someone’s going to try to deal for Reggie Jackson, and right now the only question is the size of the offer sheet.





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