Not that I download quacked versions

I am very much a creature of habit: I didn’t overthrow WordPerfect 5.1 until the last days of Ami Pro for Windows, which I persisted in using even after Lotus bought it, changed its name to WordPro and added almost Microsoftian layers of bloat to it. I am still trying to get the hang of OpenOffice.org, and at first I thought that my objections to it were rooted in its name: products, I aver, should not be named for their URLs.

But maybe it’s merely Baby Duck Syndrome, which apparently affects heavy-duty code warriors like Jeff Atwood the same way it does us nonwizardly types:

I’m as guilty of software imprinting as anyone. I was provided an evaluation copy of Visual SlickEdit, but I couldn’t bring myself to try it out because I have already “imprinted” on the Visual Studio editor. I’m still learning ways to be more effective in my preferred editor; is it really worth my time to divide my effort and attempt to learn a new, unfamiliar editor that I may not even ultimately use? That’s the software imprinting dilemma.

This is probably not the time to admit to ten years’ experience with Outlook Express.

(Via Wheels within Wheels.)





3 comments

  1. Scooby214 »

    3 August 2007 · 3:59 pm

    I’ve been using OpenOffice.org long enough that I have to occasionally hunt around to find certain functions when using MS Office.

    I think they originally wanted to call it OpenOffice, but were forced to call it OpenOffice.org because another company owns the rights to the name OpenOffice.

    While I know that OpenOffice.org is not quite as powerful as MS Office, the price is great for a cheapskate like me.

  2. CGHill »

    3 August 2007 · 5:43 pm

    MS Office is indeed packed with features, some of which I can’t imagine using. (Doesn’t mean they should take it out, necessarily, but it does mean a heavier footprint on the old PC.) And even OO.o is fairly close to industrial-strength.

    Then again, most of the stuff I write these days outside this h’yar blog I do in good old (actually, it’s not as good as it used to be) WordPad.

  3. Mister Snitch! »

    4 August 2007 · 6:21 am

    Old dogs, new tricks. I was just reading how some web designers still design for the old days when monitors only displayed 4,000 (and change) colors.

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