And a couple of Martian oxygen sensors

The Golden State sticks it to a Tar Heel, so to speak:

Estimated cost of a new catalytic converter and accompanying sensors for my 1998 Accord, including labor and tax, minus AAA discount: $902 and change.

Revised estimate after determining it needs a “California” catalytic converter, though the car was bought in Maryland and has never been west of Kansas: $1446 and change.

Two thoughts:

  • When I moved to California in 1988, I was driving a 49-state 1975 Toyota Celica, which utterly lacked a catalytic converter; after a visit to a wizard at an Exxon station in Redondo Beach, I was granted a smog certificate, complete with presumed actual numbers obtained in the official test. I assume things have gotten more complicated since then.
  • Price of the bank 2 (“front”) catalytic converter for a 2000 Infiniti I30: $813.38, not including tax ($48.52) or the exhaust gasket ($3.87). If California cars get a different part, I’m not aware of it, and neither is Alldata.

Still unexplained: why anyone would need a California converter (which, based on what little I know about CARB regulations, has to be essentially identical to the OEM cat) on the East Coast.





2 comments

  1. McGehee »

    6 September 2007 · 10:15 am

    The Californians want the rest of the planet adapted to their metabolic needs before they spread out and colonize.

  2. JR »

    19 September 2007 · 1:42 pm

    I’m having the same problem. My car was purchased in California for use in California, but i have since moved to the east coast. Now that i need to replace the converter on my ’00 civic, i’ve been quoted a price similar to yours. Nearly 2 grand for one part on a 7 year old car is too much. The reasons stated is that the computer is expecting the emissions to be at a specific level according to the strict California standards. By using a regular converter(which you could have put on), the computer will think the car is performing out of spec.

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