Now with more plastic!

Oklahoma City’s Solid Waste (aka “Trash”) Management Division has now decided to pick up any recyclable plastic from 1 (polyethylene terephthalate) to 7 (anything not included in 1 through 6). Previously they would pick up only types 1 and 2.

About half my block sets out Little Blue, the container for recyclables, for pickup every week.





4 comments

  1. GradualDazzle »

    6 September 2007 · 8:24 pm

    We got used to setting out our little green container when we lived in Des Moines, and now it feels weird to throw all that stuff in the trash ‘cuz we live in Small Town Texas. That, and in Iowa they did a five-cent deposit on all pop cans and bottles, so we never EVER threw cans and bottles away. We always collected them in a bag until the little old Bosnian men came by. They were refugees but they were too old to learn a new language, so they couldn’t really find work. Collecting cans was the only way they could buy ciggies, and they were the sweetest little guys ever, so I always saved our cans for them. One liked to show me a picture of his grandchildren.

  2. Nate »

    7 September 2007 · 11:35 am

    I’m just glad that our garbage men stopped throwing the stuff in Little Blue into the truck with the rest of the garbage. Someone – ahem – called and complained. Loudly. With shouting.

  3. CGHill »

    7 September 2007 · 11:40 am

    As they should. What’s the point of separating all this stuff if it’s all going to end up in the same hole in the ground anyway?

  4. Dan B »

    7 September 2007 · 9:56 pm

    If the 1’s (polyethylene terephthalate “PETE”) and 2’s (high-density polyethylene) are ending up in the ground, the city is burying about a net of $200/ton of recyclable plastic.

    With new technologies in place, 3’s (vinyls) and 6’s (polystyrene) are right at break even for recycling versus burying, and hence the change of policy.

    The 4’s (low-density polyethylene), 5’s (polypropylene) and 7’s (the rest of the crap) are still more cost efficient to burn or bury than recycle.

    By taking all plastics, someone apparently thinks they can get enough extra 1’s and 2’s to balance the extra labor and processing costs and enough extra 3’s and 6’s to tip them over to profitability. We’ll see.

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