Embrace the sparseness

Racked talked to seven men about how they actually feel about baldness, and the last of those seven was moi:

I knew it was going to happen, of course; my dad was balding in his 30s, and for all I know it might have been sooner than that, since I was born the year he turned 26 and I had more immediate concerns than hereditary baldness. As it turns out, it was indeed hereditary: I don’t know if I got it worse than the others because I was the firstborn, but I did get it, and quickly. Things started getting sparse before I was 25; by 40, there wasn’t much left. I did not, however, take the usual steps to conceal my condition: no expensive drugs, no transplanted plugs, no squirrel fur glued to my head. It was, I decided, what it was, and while things seem to have quit receding for the moment, I’m way past 60 and no longer noticed by anyone, myself included.

I do not begrudge any of the other six. Or Sir Patrick Stewart, pictured at the top of the article.

Oh, and this:

Responses have been edited and condensed for clarity.

This was one of the few times in my life I apparently did not need editing.





7 comments »

  1. fillyjonk »

    18 August 2017 · 11:18 am

    I was always told it came from the mom’s side.

    My dad (at 82) still has a fairly good amount of hair.

    My brother has tried to use his chin as a replacement for what he’s lost up top.

    (I admit I look with worry at my brush and the shower drain some days; I am wondering if one of the meds I am on is messing with things because I seem to be shedding more than I formerly did)

  2. J T »

    18 August 2017 · 11:26 am

    My brothers and I all have the same propensity for a receding hairline. One brother went through the expense of transplants that ended up not really working out, the other brother finally decided to keep his head shaved entirely after fretting over it for years. I went with the ignore it route and am much happier for it.

  3. McG »

    18 August 2017 · 11:52 am

    My paternal grandfather and at least one of my uncles on that side had a fivehead. Dad was almost to fore-and-a-half, but I’m well short of fore-and-a-quarter. Dad also had a bald spot but not me, so far.

    Dad’s eldest brother had barely lost any hairline at all at 89, though, so it may not just be from Mom’s side that I get it.

  4. nightfly »

    18 August 2017 · 1:22 pm

    I’ve just now started getting a noticeable bald spot in the back. From the current state of the rest of my hair I think it will eventually thin out along the top and leave me with the Picard fringe before too long.

    I guess if it was a toss-up between the acting chops and the hairline, I would have preferred Stewart’s acting chops. Ah well.

  5. Holly H »

    18 August 2017 · 1:46 pm

    If it makes you feel any better, I did see a study that found a higher level of testosterone in bald men. (Picture a group of balding scientists, typing that up, a la The Far Side).

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20121210-are-bald-men-more-virile

  6. Mike aka Proof »

    18 August 2017 · 4:43 pm

    All good men come out on top.

  7. ETat »

    18 August 2017 · 7:23 pm

    When faced with spotty baldness, men have an excellent option (unlike women) – to go for a crew cut and bare it all.
    They just don’t know how sexy that is

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