The Finch Formerly Known As Gold

20 September 2006

Hey, scratch this

British scientists have determined that little $5 and $10 wins in the lotto won't do anything for your long-term happiness.

Get up into four figures, though, and you're getting somewhere:

Andrew Oswald, a professor of economics at the University of Warwick, and Jonathan Gardner of the financial management firm Watson Wyatt, say a major money prize isn't necessary. They determined medium-sized lottery wins ranging from about $2,000 to $225,000 had a long-term sustained impact in the overall happiness of the winners.

On average, two years after their win, medium-sized lottery winners had a mental well-being score 1.4 points better than previously — meaning, loosely, two years after their win they were slightly more than 10 percent happier than the average person without a win or only a tiny lottery win.

I'm hoping for $7,599.

Why, yes, I did get my Visa bill yesterday. Why do you ask?

(Via Fark.com.)

Posted at 8:31 AM to Common Cents


British scientists have determined that little $5 and $10 wins in the lotto won't do anything for your long-term happiness.

That's because they always spend the winnings on more lottery tickets. Usually while I'm waiting in line behind them.

There's nothing like having your hot food get cold and your cold drink get warm while the [I've been told I use this word too much] in front of me scratches off his tickets right at the counter, gets a $5 winner, redeems it on the spot for more tickets, gets another $5 winner, etc.

And the [I've been told I use this word too much] behind the counter must have uncorrected severe myopia because the fourteen people waiting to pay for their purchases never get noticed.

Posted by: McGehee at 11:32 AM on 20 September 2006