Archive for Scams and Spams

The ever-popular Suck Up to the Webmaster trick

This landed in the spam bucket on One of Those Other Sites:

This design is spectacular! You obviously know how to keep a reader entertained.

Between your wit and your videos, I was almost moved to start my own blog (well, almost … HaHa!) Excellent job.

I really enjoyed what you had to say, and more than that, how you presented it.

Too cool!

This came from 178.137.95.251, and boasted a link to a Pharmacy of Dubious Credentials. There are times when I wonder if we’d have even half this much spam if — well, there’s this statistic:

Counterfeit Viagra, despite generally being cheaper, can contain harmful substances or substances that affect how Viagra works, such as blue printer ink, amphetamines, metronidazole, boric acid, and rat poison, as well as talcum powder and commercial paint. The annual counterfeit Viagra trade is worth an estimated $75 billion per year.

Viagra is one of the world’s most counterfeited medicines. According to a Pfizer study, around 80% of sites claiming to sell Viagra were selling counterfeits.

I doubt Pfizer has ever made $75 billion in a year off the stuff. And you’d think printer ink would make the fakes more expensive.

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Still better than store-bought

Live from Windows Live Mail, it’s a rather unfortunate email spam:

email subject: Can I ask you something?

I’m reasonably certain this is not an attempt to sell me truffles.

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Nine point something stone

Received in the email spam trap:

Spam header: She lost 133 pounds on a students budget

Most students being chronically broke, I find this assertion almost not risible.

Oh, and this was the first paragraph of the text sneaked into the unlinked area:

In and of itself, one man leaving one band in the middle of the 1960s might warrant little more than a historical footnote. But what makes the departure of Eric Clapton from the Yardbirds on March 13, 1965, more significant is the long and complicated game of musical chairs it set off within the world of British blues rock. When Clapton walked out on the Yardbirds, he did more than just change the course of his own career. He also set in motion a chain of events that would see not just one, but two more guitar giants pass through the Yardbirds on their way toward significant futures of their own. And through the various groups they would later form, influence, join and quit, these three guitar heroes — Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page — would shape more than a decade’s worth of rock and roll.

This appears to be where they stole it. “Pass through the Yardbirds,” all by itself, is almost not risible.

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You want a piece of this?

So this came in over the transom back in January:

I’m currently working with a brilliant business who operates in the education industry. I noticed your site has published a very interesting article, dustbury.com: Almost Yogurt Archives, which is why I think a collaboration between us could work well.

We would like to feature a bespoke piece of content on your site, which we think would be of great interest to you and your audience. For the privilege of being featured on your site, we would be happy to offer you a fee of $50.

We hope to hear back from you soon.

Obviously she picked a link at random to throw in there. When I ignored her, she repeated her request, a little louder.

At the other end of the spectrum:

I’m a freelancer who works for … an online media agency. Would you be interested in writing and posting an article for a fixed fee? The article should be relevant to the category and to the readers of your site.

If you are interested, please let me know and I’ll provide you with more details. Also, if you own other sites please send me their URLs, so I can review them.

It’s not like she thinks I’m swell or anything, either:

Depending on your local law, you may need to make it clear that the links you use are in fact adverts.

But of course they are.

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Still more of the best-unlaid plans

Almost certainly you’ve seen this before:

I am an American man, and I have decided to boycott American women. In a nutshell, American women are the most likely to cheat on you, to divorce you, to get fat, to steal half of your money in the divorce courts, don’t know how to cook or clean, don’t want to have children, etc. Therefore, what intelligent man would want to get involved with American women?

American women are generally immature, selfish, extremely arrogant and self-centered, mentally unstable, irresponsible, and highly unchaste. The behavior of most American women is utterly disgusting, to say the least.

This blog is my attempt to explain why I feel American women are inferior to foreign women (non-American women), and why American men should boycott American women, and date/marry only foreign (non-American) women.

In fact, you’ve seen it here twice before. Both incidents were in 2011, which tells me that this character can carry a grudge nearly as long as I can, and he might even have a long memory.

I sum him up this way: “He wants you to know he’s taken the Red Pill. He doesn’t want you to know that he begged for a chewable version.”

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Automated burglar’s tools

So I got curious and followed up a link spammed at me, and discovered this annoying little product:

WORDAI is first multi-languages article spinner that actually understands that words have different meanings, for you as customer that means that you will be able to create human readable articles with single click of your mouse.

With WordAI you can easily create and spin articles in these languages: English, Spanish, French and Italian which makes WordAI one of the best article spinners available (according to SEO and marketing forums it is the best article spinner out there.)

And we all know what I think about SEO and marketing forums.

Unlike other spinners, WordAi fully understands what each word content means. It doesn’t view sentences as just a list of words, it views them as real things that interact with each other. This human like understanding allows WordAI to automatically rewrite entire sentences from scratch. This high level of rewriting ensures that Google and Copyscape can’t detect your content while still remaining human readable!

Original Sentence: Nobody has been arrested by the police officers, but the suspect is being interrogated by them.

Automatic Rewrite: Law enforcement are interrogating the defendant, although they have not detained anybody.

I rather suspect that this particular sentence is more the exception than the rule.

  • WordAi not only understands what each word means, but also how each word interacts with each other
  • It looks for possible ways to rewrite your article based on what the article truly means
  • WordAi will often completely rewrite sentences so they share nothing in common with the original sentence
  • This means your article is unique and can’t be detected by Google as spun content!

I give Google maybe three weeks to get past this — and not to tell anyone, of course.

This package sells for $49.95 a month. Six hundred dollars a year — oh, wait, there’s a discount for a full-year license — to enable someone to steal someone else’s content.

I would like to feed their fingers to the wolverines. And if there’s anything left, there’s always the acid bath.

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From the Nice Try files

Retrieved from the spam bin:

Actual comment spam screenshot: Wow that was odd. I just wrote an incredibly long comment but after I clicked submit my comment didn't show up. Grrrr ... well I’m not writing all that over again. Anyhow, just wanted to say excellent blog!

Bots are not known for their powers of concentration. (Nor is there any need for them to be, since the supply of bots is seemingly unending.)

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Unidentical twins

Received last night as comment spam:

On the other hand, a bad credit history won’t customize the rates much until you have high valued collateral to aid your buy (in the case of Secured Auto Loans). Such things as prepayment penalties, interest amounts and any other fee included will directly impact on your repayment ability. Of course, one must pay for that benefits of obtaining instant cash easily available as interest.

Seven minutes later, attached to the same post:

On the other hand, a bad credit standing won’t modify the rates much if you don’t have high valued collateral to help your buy (in the case of Secured Auto Loans). All you have to do is to fill a fairly easy application with all the details. Of course, you have to pay to the benefits of obtaining instant cash easily available as interest.

This bot apparently owns a thesaurus, but not a very good thesaurus. You can block it at 37.229.35.169.

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An off-pitch pitch

Received in email this past week:

Hello,

Love what you’re doing on www.dustbury.com

I was checking out your site today and found this guest post you published. I’d love to be your next guest author.

I’ve been some topics that I think your readers would get a ton of value from:

• Best Winter Chore Clothes for Homesteaders
• 10 Winter Outfit Ideas for Women

Now what do you think are the chances that she actually saw the most recent guest post here, which was put up ten years ago and isn’t even part of the current WordPress database?

Yeah, that’s what I thought.

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Netphish

This is the first Netflix-related phishing scheme I’ve seen.

Subject: We need your help #Netflix-8124-7364-8674:

Fake Netflix phishing

Since when does “information” get pluraled?

The link goes to some unspecified place shortened by bit.ly. The actual source seems to be jesusjobsy.com, which has existed for about two weeks.

Incidentally, whois.net, asked about that domain, offered to sell me jesuschristsaviour.com for $3,688.

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24-carrot bunk

And make sure you know what the doctor himself eats. This showed up in the spam bucket yesterday:

Spam header: Doctor Eating Carrots Makes You Fat

This is the pitch:

Did you know eating carrots and other vegetables can cause you to gain weight, and linked to severe obesity?

That’s according to a shocking medical report that’s just been released to the public.

In it, several top scientists say that we’ve been getting weight loss “all wrong” for the last 30+ years…

And that if you really want to burn fat, drop pounds, and be healthier…

There are three major changes to your diet you need to make right now.

These new dietary changes will surprise you.

Never eat these vegetables if you want to lose weight.

What? And give up my night vision?

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Toss that word salad

I still have an AOL mailbox, at least partially because I’ve never had a good reason to delete it. Not much shows up in it. And this particular piece of spam, allegedly touting “bathroom remodeling trends by experts in yuor [sic] area,” had a fair number of hidden phrases to give it seeming validity.

Seeming, that is, until you actually read them:

1EH honour

animalism pickup cargo plaint with pompon or sledge thread luminous saliva taffeta with baby or captious 63e road

flitch dysentery shuffle repository with foul or materialism
congruity classical thymus

vane of germinate proceeding canter woodshed mortar ruby viosterol with qursh or interplay fiancee of enormity flamboyant glaze

Then again, maybe I’d like a bathroom with flamboyant glaze, enormity notwithstanding.

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Other theaters of engagement

Everybody hates spam. For all I know, even spammers hate spam; telemarketers (spammers with dial equipment) are probably not happy when I call them out on Twitter. However, I seem to get less of it than most. From the WordPress dashboard here:

Akismet has protected your site from 40,195 spam comments already. There’s nothing in your spam queue at the moment.

Now this is a low-volume sort of site, with 250-350 visitors a day. I’d expect someone with twice the traffic to get at least twice the spam, maybe more. But this kind of floors me:

[T]he cleanup of spam … initially involves deleting the contents of the spam filter. You’ll understand how important that filter is when I tell you that I delete about 10,000 spam comments a day. Spam must be profitable in gaming the Google algorithm, or whatever the goals are, because it has proliferated in recent years to a point that would be completely overwhelming without the spam filter.

Then again, I have one more tool at my disposal: a plugin that bans spamming IPs, a whole bank at a time if need be. It’s not 100-percent reliable — there are always ways to sneak past a barrier — but I’ve denied entry to approximately 1.2 million would-be spammers.

Still, 1.2 million, for someone getting ten thousand a day, is barely four months’ worth.

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Wayward-wiener relief

Bonus points for starting with the verb “screw”:

Screw going to the doctor for your bedroom performance problems. You can fix them yourself WITHOUT worrying about expensive costs or side effects.

Don’t believe me?

All it takes is concocting 3,000 year old drink recipe that consists of:

1. 6 herbs
2. 2 fruits
3. 1 amino acid

Whip it up. Put it in a cup. Drink it down. And watch your woman’s sexually frustrated frown turn upside down.

Best of all, this drink only costs 30 cents to make. But I guess you want to know the specifics, huh?

Well, no, not really.

Extra spam words with the package:

/Medvedev/ folgende /eid /earlier /profile /hike /thank /please /stations/ wave /morning, reset /format /Turner/ core /date /customer/ jullie /dirty /hist /Va /virtual /gloire /quits /soumises /musique /argot /659 station /sweater /sorten /regulation /priest /Schumacher /orde responsibility /aan /welle /outside /everyone /driven /3 /HILFE /idbzymo /unfiltered hitchhikes /zxyxhjg /315-1952 /pesa /unhopedly /xkawgiygzs /ductive /hastening trinken /attendance /300-3314 /Candido /restaurant /vuwdn /weighs /dll /spread /in FILETIME /Food /3D /completed /1BC31C80 /signing /Thanks /PLEASE /buys /bens cameronian /1em /01C2DDA1 /2 /version /subscription /buckmast /matamoros /that’s Visit /cfm /elevation /is /example Howells /JENNIFER /led /Thank /second /general /lyngbyeae /multiplies /disastrous PermSize /desto /al /OK /XX /3D3D128m /Iran /regular /beenBelleville /axhwjvf ozyys /scroll /parliamentarians /other /James /Courts /verdriet /separately /Moz collector /filth /P’North /ghzyrr /EMAIL

Followed by several hundred more. This might be explainable, but not by me.

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Le spam

This was received in French, ostensibly from an .ru domain:

Hello,

I have a little question; Here I found the craft that I want in my price I credit institution set to be “good” in the purchases of debt the credit period etc …

We started to oralament agreement with the real estate agency Evian on tafif after consultation with the people selling

Now we will sign sale documents.

How’s it going?

On signing the sales agreement, I have to pay a security deposit is that credit union can lend me?

Should I take a notary or I can take buyer / seller the same?

What documents do I require at this signature?

Have you been full of my credit institution after signing the agreement to have the most interesting rate? Or do you keep your bank?

I have some work to do in; presented in compliance etc … and installation of a wood stove; how to make specifications to globalize my loan?

His is done before signing the sales documents or evaluating the work “the fishy”?

In short how did you expect to benefit for the pinel law , or estate tax exemption of the law duflot

In addition, I ask myself if I have the opportunity to have a new apartment. If that can back up my alley.

It’s true, I think, a new home is better because it meets all new heating safety standards etc ..

I read on the internet that there had laws of deficaliation, pigeon, I’m not taxable.

How it’s going?

In addition, I want to change regions, is one of my goal and my children to school.

full of questions …

“Oralment.” Cool.

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Clearly misaddressed

In a spamlet received last night, “Carley” (not her real name) asks if I have any interest in a “sexy depraved pussycat.”

More deprived than depraved, I am, but that’s another matter. Anyway:

Hi stallion, this is your girl. I am Lakisha.

I want you to bonk me as a little bitch. I bleed juice with desire to feel such sex!

Don’t forget that I’m waiting with impatience for a depraved man on this site.

Again: more deprived than depraved, “Lakisha” (not your real name).

The only really amusing aspect of this item, really, was the domain name used, or feigned, by the sender: megabulkmessage207.com. Due to a most lamentable dearth of dubious sites — only one link offered, and it wasn’t even obscured — this thing failed to break 2.5 on Spam Score, where 5 is my normal threshold and 25-30 is entirely too common. To borrow a phrase, this thing doesn’t even leak juice, let alone bleed it.

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One weird trick to ruin your day

I am slightly more resistant to the blandishments of these pitches, but only slightly:

If you’re like me, you keep getting spam emails with enticing come-ons like “Would you like to know the four subtle warning signs that you’re near death from [fill in the blank]?” Or, “Would you like to know how to look 30 years younger in 10 seconds?” or “…how to lose your belly fat?”

And why is it always four warning signs? Two or three wouldn’t impress us?

Have you ever fallen for it and clicked on the link? In moments of weakness, I have. The ensuing experience is always the same. Someone — a doctor, a spokesperson — appears in a video and tells you what he/she is going to tell you. “I’m going to tell you this heretofore secret information about how you can energize/smooth out/avoid…” and he or she goes on and on and on till you find yourself shrieking, “Don’t tell us what you’re going to tell us. Get on with telling us, already, you friggin’ torturer!!!”

The pitch is never over until they find some way to tap your wallet. I would sooner believe fleeing Nigerian officials than these Doctors of Skulduggery.

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Bellowing phish

This one is almost self-explanatory:

Not a message from EarthLink

The actual link goes to a subdirectory at web-work.de. And the rotters had the effrontery to mark this as High Priority, which of course earns my wrath on general principle; what’s more, their subject line was “Your account has been limited,” which is almost always a dead giveaway.

Still, “link bellow” is sort of amusing.

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Administer this, pal

I received three copies of this presumptuous little grubitation, allegedly from the “WebMail HelpDesk”:

Dear User,

Your E-mail has exceeded 2GB which is created by our Webmaster. You are currently running at 2.30GB and you will not be able to send or receive new messages in the next 24hours until you re-validate your mailbox.

Please complete the information below to re-validate your account

(1) E-mail:
(2) Name:
(3) Password:
(4) Confirm Password:

Regards,
Technical Support
For: System administrator
192.168.0.1

Who knew there was a “System administrator” living inside the router?

Weirdly, there were no links to be found anywhere in the message, so if this is phishing, there’s no line to reel in the suckers, and how many people are dumb enough to fill out the form and hit Reply?

Oh, yeah. You’re right, of course.

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And the phish keep right on coming

Something (mis)identified as “PPL Safety Check” dropped this little deuce into the punchbowl of my mail client:

Fake PayPal message

OMG, Pakistan!

As a practical matter, so far as potential identity theft goes, there’s little difference between Pakistan and Punxsutawney.

The bogus link goes to something called supportticketmanage.com, whose primary business, we may safely assume, is something other than managing support tickets. They’re also not so hot at spelling: “access” has two C’s.

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Head ’em up

Fished out of the spam trap for some inexplicable reason:

However, there is another standpoint that only one single image gains market recognition is not enough because its figure is too stuffless. My favorite feature about the Weather Bug app is the temperature display in the notification bar which gives you the current conditions and can also notify you of severe weather.

All these would make excellent add ons to any Angry Birds themed favor box.

I focused on those two words “favor box,” and after a few seconds remembered Gil Favor, the trail boss on the old Rawhide series, played by Eric Fleming. (Rowdy Yates, the, um, rowdy fellow played by Clint Eastwood, didn’t become trail boss until the eighth and final season.) I’m pretty sure neither Gil nor Rowdy had much truck with angry birds.

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Hit ’em where they drive

Nothing, I suspect, makes a bogus email more persuasive than the inclusion of something actually (sort of) true. This particular scam, by that reckoning, is utterly convincing in its presentation:

A new malware scam is posing as a speeding ticket email with a fake link that is said to load malicious code onto users’ computers. The emails, sent to at least few local residents in Tredyffrin, Pennsylvania, purport to come from the local police department. Malware emails that masquerade as something official are not rare, but these messages are fairly unique: they are said to contain accurate speeding data, including street names, speed limits, and actual driving speeds, according to the Tredyffrin Police Department, located close to Philadelphia.

It’s suspected that the data is coming from an app with permission to track phone GPS data. That could either be a legitimate app that has been compromised, or a purpose-built malicious app that was uploaded online. As anyone who has used a GPS navigator knows, location data can be used to roughly calculate your travel speed. The emails ask for payment of the speeding ticket, but no apparatus is set up to receive such fines. Instead, a link that claims to lead to a photo of the user’s license plate instead loads malware onto the user’s device.

“Citations,” says the PD, “are never emailed or sent in the form of an email attachment.” Still, people believe that banks and such will send you email to ask you your email address — which they obviously already have.

“Tredyffrin,” incidentally, is Welsh; it only looks like a J. K. Rowling place name.

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Nor will croutons help

I’ve perhaps too lightly tossed around the term “word salad,” but I’m pretty sure this piece of comment spam (picked up elsewhere) at the very least deserves a sneeze guard:

Walking quite Walking might not be actually wow play profound, But then I develop into darned when it n’t most of usually unquestionably this particular saddest movie I before set up. Subsequent you shelter, A new consistent gentleman trying to outlive one particular zombie apocalypse during the time safe guarding a little daughter child who were trapped by compact rrn a very treehouse. While doing the mission, You earn advanced one another watching kids shut off, And in addition waste really does reach an blower in certainly lovely unbearable stylish.

I figure I have plenty of examples of “certainly lovely unbearable stylish” in the picture archives around here (5300 images on site, about 75,000 on my home box). Then again, I strive to be a consistent gentleman.

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Thieves, honor, and so forth

Incoming comment spam, in the WordPress system, always has an email address attached, and almost always carries the URL of some alleged site. WordPress, if it’s not otherwise occupied, will actually attempt to display that alleged site in a frame if you hover over it. Often as not, the “site” comes up 404, and most of the time that it doesn’t, it’s not worth looking at.

Last night, though, was a first: a site that scolded me for having an ad blocker turned on.

Understand this. A spammer scolded me for blocking his ads. On the Gall Spectrum, this places right around Purely Unmitigated.

Rather than drop an email into the proffered address, which is probably bogus anyway, I have decided simply to block the miscreant’s IP address. And no, I’m not giving him a link either.

(Oh, you wanted to know the offending IP? Well, it is subject to change. However, I’m pretty sure you’ll never, ever get anything useful from 95.105.127.113.)

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And suddenly it was gone

The ostensible selling point of Snapchat is its vanishing data: everything goes away on a schedule worthy of mayflies. And apparently, “everything” means everything:

Snapchat is famous for its disappearing messages, but unfortunately not everything in this world is ephemeral when you need it to be. The LA-based company disclosed today that a number of its current and former employees had their identities compromised by a cyber attack this month.

“Last Friday, Snapchat’s payroll department was targeted by an isolated email phishing scam in which a scammer impersonated our Chief Executive Officer and asked for employee payroll information,” Snapchat explained in a blog post. “Unfortunately, the phishing email wasn’t recognized for what it was — a scam — and payroll information about some current and former employees was disclosed externally.”

It gets worse. Said @SwiftOnSecurity:

There’s a chance the direct deposit bank info for employees was compromised as well. Good idea to DD into a dedicated account you empty.

We worry about brute-force attacks on our security, and then we just go handing information over to people. And we wonder why this sort of thing happens so often.

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A new crease in the black hat

Anyone who owns a domain has likely received a “bill” from a third party offering to renew that domain at some ridiculous multiple of the actual registration price. Enough people have caught on to this scheme that now the scamsters are having to pretend they’re offering a service:

SEO pitch for wendex.net

Obviously the most important thing here is “SECURE ONLINE PAYMENT.” Amount of said payment: $63.00.

In the fine print down below:

You have received this message because you elected to receive special notification proposal. If you no longer wish to receive our notifications, please unsubscribe here or mail us a written request to US Main Office: SEO Domain Registration Company, Los Angeles, CA 90036, Email: seodomainregservice@mail.com or Asia Main Office: SEO Domain Registration Company, Shenzhen Futian, Email: seodomainregservice@mail.com. If you have multiple accounts with us, you must opt out for each one individually in order to stop receiving notifications notices. We are a search engine optimization company. We do not directly register or renew domain names. We are selling traffic generator software tools. This message is CAN-SPAM compliant. THIS IS NOT A BILL. THIS IS A NOTIFICATION PROPOSAL. YOU ARE UNDER NO OBLIGATION TO PAY THE AMOUNT STATED UNLESS YOU ACCEPT THIS NOTIFICATION PROPOSAL. This message, which contains promotional material strictly along the guidelines of the CAN-SPAM act of 2003. We have clearly mentioned the source mail-id of this email, also clearly mentioned our subject lines and they are in no way misleading. Please do not reply to this email, as we are not able to respond to messages sent to this address.

I want to see how a “written request” gets to the SEO Domain Registration Company without a street address in Los Angeles, CA 90036 (near Hancock Park and the Miracle Mile) or however the Chinese sort these things out in Futian district, Shenzhen.

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More useless advice

Recently arrived in the spam trap:

Have you ever thought about adding a little bit more than just your articles? I mean, what you say is valuable and everything. However think of if you added some great visuals or video clips to give your posts more, “pop”! Your content is excellent but with pics and videos, this website could undeniably be one of the very best in its field. Very good blog!

This might have carried a little more weight had the sender been identified as something other than “Free porn XXX Slut MILF.”

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Lowest possible priority

This arrived in the mail yesterday, and as Fake Priority Mail envelopes go, this is one of the fakest:

Bogus Priority Mail from a local auto dealer

The fine print off to the right is hilarious:

Package intended for NextDay Delivery shipments only. Contents should be packed securely to ensure safe and prompt delivery. Contents are tracked nationwide. No liquids allowed.

And then, in even finer print, an alleged form number: ND912-0623. I include this for the sake of Googlers and such who might have gotten this piece of utter crap and thought for a moment that it was legit. It is, of course, nothing of the sort: it’s a pitch from one of the shadier auto dealers in town, complete with a plastic disk about poker-chip size, to make you think someone might have actually sent you a coin.

Incidentally, no one ever loses at these fake games — you win the absolutely lowest possible prize — and there’s also a bogus “Instant Savings Voucher” from the crapweasels, designed to look like a check for $3,534.92.

“Tracked nationwide,” indeed. Hey, pal, track this.

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Plange this

This landed in the mailbox, and provided small amusement for a short period of time. Assume [sic] throughout:

I want you, Handsome! I want to come to you and surrender to you all without the end)) I will be like a fire. It’ll light your torch of passion and we’ll delve into the world of illusions and fabulous pleasure. This pleasure will be so nice for us. We’ll be in the bed with you, and we will do some crazy things)) I’ll slide along your body. My hair and nipples will tickle your body pleasantly. My tongue will lick you. I’ll kiss your lips)) You will get a very strong pleasure and will get excited from it. That I’ll begin to stroke your cock very in a passionate rhythm. You’ll plunge into the tremendous passion. I want to plange with you. Call me.

Obviously this is no one who knows me.

Then there was this bit of weirdness at the bottom:

This Week In Webclips
Ando’s always welcome here, Mikey Wright rages, taking care of PNG, and more
Sneak Peek: In This Issue
At First Sight
Firsthand accounts of some of the greatest modern surf discoveries.
Journey to the Center
Finding the point of intersection between the old world and the new in Gabon.
The Long Way to Lagundr

Curiously, no links were provided for any of these, not that I was going to look at them or anything.

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Phake phederal phish

This oddball item didn’t pass the first-level spam filter, but I fished it out just to see what it was all about:

Phony US Postal Service message

There is, as indicated, a .doc file attached, the sort of thing one clicks on only if one has a death wish, or if one’s picture accompanies the definition of gullible in the dictionary.

Oh, from the footnotes:

Note
Please do not reply to this message. This email message was sent from a notification-only address that cannot accept incoming email.

The nerve.

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