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With respect to the prevailing style of poetry, at the present day, in our country, we apprehend that it will be found, in too many instances, tinged with a sickly and affected imitation of the peculiar manner of some of the late popular poets of England. We speak not of a disposition to enumerate whatever is beautiful and excellent in their writings, — still less would we be understood as intending to censure that sort of imitation which, exploring all the treasures of English poetry, culls from all a diction, that shall form a natural and becoming dress for the conceptions of the writer, — this is a course of preparation which every one ought to go through before he appears before the public — but we desire to set a mark on that servile habit of copying, which adopts the vocabulary of some favorite author, and apes the fashions of his sentences, and cramps and forces the ideas into a shape, which they would not nat