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I seldom read dance criticism, mostly because critics nearly never mention the music, much less how the music is used. Yet without the music the dance would be without its spine. A good choreographer goes against the sound in a manner that only the sound could provoke, finding in the music's potential more than even the composer is aware of. No critic has yet written an essay on the interaction — on how music, because it has no specific meaning, can make or break a given "meaningful" scene. Music's power lies in an absence of human significance and this power dominates all mediums it contacts. When Georges Auric composed the score for Blood of a Poet he produced what is commonly known as love music for love scenes, game music for game scenes, funeral music for funeral scenes. Cocteau had the bright idea of replacing the love music with the funeral, game music with the love, funeral with game, which gives the film its surreal correctness.

The sea reminds me of Debussy's La mer; La mer never reminds me of the sea. But if a picture recalls the sea, the sea conjures up no picture of anything beyond itself. In this sense, water is as abstract as music, but a picture of water represents an abstraction. Whatever title Debussy might have chosen, his work i