Honestly, I hadn’t heard

A St. Louis-area dealer group knows the word, or at least the syllable:

I caught a fragment of this between innings in a Cardinals game, and had to track it down. Of course I did.

Addendum: They also have a Chevy dealership in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

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Not so fast, Chubby

The UK’s National Health Service is reshuffling its priorities, and you go to the bottom of the list:

Obese people will be routinely refused operations across the NHS, health service bosses have warned, after one authority said it would limit procedures on an unprecedented scale.

Hospital leaders in North Yorkshire said that patients with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or above — as well as smokers — will be barred from most surgery for up to a year amid increasingly desperate measures to plug a funding black hole. The restrictions will apply to standard hip and knee operations.

The decision, described by the Royal College of Surgeons as the “most severe the modern NHS has ever seen”, led to warnings that other trusts will soon be forced to follow suit and rationing will become the norm if the current funding crisis continues.

Which, of course, it will:

The restrictions echo others made by health bosses in Hertfordshire, the North West and London in the past two years, where blanket referral bans were imposed on patients on the basis of their weight.

Last month St Helens CCG in Merseyside said it was considering temporarily suspending all non-essential hospital referrals by GPs because of financial concerns.

Reports of rationing have emerged after NHS England admitted in May that its provider sector overspent by £2.45 billion in 2015-16, more than a threefold increase on the previous year.

And inevitably:

The figure, which was described as conservative by think-tanks, prompted some hospital chief executives to question the future viability of free universal healthcare.

What are the chances Her Majesty’s Government will abandon the effort? Pretty close to nil.

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Quick slowed

Bill Quick explains why you haven’t been able to get to Daily Pundit these days:

I initiated the transfer of the Daily Pundit domain to the new host as registrar on 8/27. I was told at the time that it would take “up to seven days” for the transfer to complete, at which point the domain’s DNS data would be pointed at the correct site, that data would propagate over the internet (DNS data is basically directions on how to find a site/IP#/whatever).

Well, the 7th day has dawned, and the transfer is still “pending.”

I hope we’ll see some action today, although when I inquired about it a couple of days ago, a tech said, “Sometimes it takes a little longer.” Which sent shivers down my spine.

I’ve done this twice, with two different domains, and neither time did it take more than three days. Then again, different hosts were involved.

In the meantime:

Anyhow, if you want to just look at Daily Pundit in its new home, go to this link: http://67.199.41.109/

You’ll see a few things right away: The site is there, it looks weird, and nothing on it works because every time you click on something it tells you that the site cannot be reached.

Still, this can’t last forever — can it?

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A hundred years of heels

I have no idea what’s next, but this is what has gone before:

HelloGiggles notes that the most recent styles are also the most dangerous-looking. The significance of this is left as an exercise for the student.

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Failure to plan

I am having a whole lot of trouble coming up with any sympathy for this guy:

The protagonist in this story, Todd Anderson, wants to help the environment, so he bought a 2016 Chevrolet Volt. Not a bad choice — decent electric range for around-town jaunts and a gas generator for out-of-town trips. Another bonus: $12,500 provided by Ontario taxpayers to help him foot the bill. The problem is, he has nowhere to charge it, and this is the city’s fault.

Anderson says he has to run an extension cord to his outdoor parking spot (kitty corner to his home) in order to juice up the Volt. He has installed a recharging station on his front lawn, but the street in front of his house is a no parking zone. If he parks there (and he does), Anderson has to run a cord across the sidewalk, potentially tripping people, while parking tickets collect under his wiper blades.

Some might say that he could have avoided the situation by not purchasing a vehicle that requires a driveway. Or, he could wait until his living accommodations allow him to easily use such a vehicle. Anderson doesn’t see it that way. The city, he says, should make it possible for residents to charge their cars on the street.

“I don’t think someone who drives a gas car would put up with not being able to use a gas station on a daily basis,” he told the Toronto Star.

You’d think he might have been aware of these things before he bought the vehicle.

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Rattle and hum and more rattle

About two minutes after seven, I heard it: like thunder, but without all that aerial ballet.

And then I felt what must have been a groundwave, north to south, causing all sorts of unexpected jiggliness in my week-old bed and then moving on.

It came out like this:

I note that 5.6 is what we had on a November evening in 2011.

Pawnee, about an hour and a half west of Tulsa, got the worst of it:

But there were reports of falling bricks as far away as Oklahoma City.

Update, 7 September: USGS now says it’s a 5.8.

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Something to get

Roger Green just put out a retrospective of Billy Preston’s solo work; being the spoilsport I am, I hung a comment on it to the effect that Preston was the only sideman ever to be credited on the label of a Beatles record (“Get Back” b/w “Don’t Let Me Down”).

This, in turn, got me thinking of “Get Up and Go,” which struck me as the one Rutles recording that came closest to being legally actionable:

As it happens, Neil Innes, happy proprietor of the Rutles name and music, did get sued over several Fab Four-alikes — John Lennon had warned him — but not “Get Up and Go.”

Speaking of John Lennon, he wrote “Don’t Let Me Down,” the B-side of “Get Back,” which Rod Stewart appropriated for Part 2 of “The Killing of Georgie.” (“The lawyers never noticed,” Lennon quipped.) “Georgie” was remarkable for its time — 1976 — in that its protagonist was an openly gay man who’d found acceptance, even acclaim. Billy Preston, poor fellow, never could bring himself to come out of the closet until the very end. “Will it go round in circles?” Billy asked. I think it just did.

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Tuned out

Brief summation of last week’s meme:

… this coming from one of those execrable “PUA” sites (PUA = pick-up-artist, which means “a guy not actually looking for a relationship but seeking a bit of fun and maybe a good-looking woman to impress his friends with”) about talking to women with headphones. And my slightly-sad response was that there have been plenty of times I wasn’t wearing headphones and would actually have welcomed someone talking to me (well, maybe not a pick-up artist, but I’m not the type of woman they would be interested in anyway) and no one does.

Given my own distinctly non-PUA approach to the matter, I think I’d just bring along a set of headphones — I have a spare — and see if I can direct the conversation this way:

Me: “Here, put these on.”

She: “Why?”

Me: “I’m afraid I might want to talk to you. Trust me, it’s better this way.”

I have, of course, no reason to think this would actually work. But it does fit my modus operandi almost perfectly.

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Where she danced

“The most beautiful girl in the world,” said producer Walter Wanger about Yvonne de Carlo, whom he chose for the lead role in 1945’s Salome, Where She Danced, an implausible story that nonetheless made her a star at twenty-three.

And hey, I’m not one to argue with Walter Wanger:

Yvonne de Carlo, 1940s

Yvonne de Carlo, 1940s

Yvonne de Carlo, 1940s

The film roles began to dry up in the early 1960s; Universal talked her into a TV series.

Yvonne de Carlo as Lily Munster

After The Munsters was canceled, de Carlo made her way to the stage; her signature role, perhaps, was Carlotta Campion in Stephen Sondheim’s Follies.

Yvonne de Carlo died in 2007 at eighty-five.

(With thanks to Van Dyke Parks. Yes, that Van Dyke Parks.)

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Ain’t no sunshine when it’s dark

I get the feeling that they’d have been happier if the Mayflower had landed in Jacksonville:

Of all the major cities on America’s eastern seaboard, none is as far north or east as Boston. Which creates a slight problem in winter: The sun sets really early. As in, for most of December, well before happy hour.

The state, it appears, might do something about that. Governor Charles Baker recently signed a bill ordering a study of the wisdom of moving its 10,555 square miles into a time zone that would brighten the end of the day in the months the Northern Hemisphere tilts away from the sun. The idea came from Quincy resident Tom Emswiler, who worries Massachusetts is losing college grads to sunnier climes. On Dec. 9 last year, the sun went down in Boston at 4:11 p.m., only 22 minutes later than in the Yukon.

I assure you, 5:17 pm (typical Way-Early Sunset here on the South Plains) is no picnic either.

Emswiler says Massachusetts should throw in with those who live in the Atlantic Time Zone, which covers eastern Canada, the Caribbean and parts of South America, and do away with changing the clocks in spring and summer. From November through March, the sun would set an hour later than it does now, and those brutish winter days would lose some of their sting.

The sun would rise an hour later too, but the thinking is that darkness in the morning is less depressing than darkness at the end of the day.

My commute for the last decade or so has been in darkness nine months out of every twelve. It gets old very quickly.

Still, I feel I ought to support anything that weakens the deadly grip of Daylight Saving Time.

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My mind on my money

And my money on my mind. Snoop Dogg notwithstanding, this is not a position to which I aspire:

I imagine being rich is kind of a pain in the ass. Yes, I know, somebody famous once said “I’ve been rich and I’ve been poor and being rich is better,” but you have to constantly be thinking about your money and what you should be doing with it, where you should invest it, who is trying to steal it. Now some people might take to that kind of agonizing like a duck to water, they might actually enjoy it. Me, I find it tedious and boring. Fortunately there are things like Mutual Funds that remove most of the day to day agony.

Being rich requires paying attention to your money. Stop paying attention and all that money will wander off. And what do you do with a billion dollars anyway? I mean after you’ve bought your fancy car, boat, house, airplane? You invest it in something that you hope will make more money.

I’m not at all suited to these things. If I showed up on the Forbes 400 at, say, #399, I’d presumably have to start thinking about how I avoid dropping off the list next year. Perhaps fortunately, this is not going to be a problem for me, inasmuch as I have a mortgage and a lot of nerve damage and a five-figure net worth, well short of the $1.7 billion it takes to make the 400 these days. At least, I can console myself, it’s five figures on the positive side of the ledger. (It wasn’t always.)

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Neapolitan is dead

Now it’s Camo ‘n Cream:

Blue Bell Camo 'N Cream ice cream

Camo ‘n Cream Ice Cream is a combination of pistachio almond, milk chocolate and cream cheese.

“We are having a little fun with this flavor,” said Carl Breed, director of marketing for Blue Bell. “You see the camo design on everything these days, so we thought why not create an ice cream flavor that looks camouflage? The best part is these three flavors taste great together. We tried a few different combinations but chose these flavors because they complement each other so well.”

Yeah, but how do you know when the package is empty?

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Have you seen this Wizard’s?

I admit to having shopped at this place a time or two, twenty-some-odd years ago:

At least the keyboard looked substantial.

(From the collection of Rob O’Hara.)

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When it all turned sour

Roberta X theorizes that “the battle for the soul of the Federal government was lost by 1913”:

What did we get in 1913? The odious Woodrow Wilson, who argued that government should not be deemed evil and advocated the use of government to allay social ills and advance society’s welfare in a textbook, The State, used in college courses through the 1920s. He believed that America’s system of checks and balances complicated American governance, and wrote that the Presidency “will be as big as and as influential as the man who occupies it.” There’s your modern imperial-style President and the all-encompassing FedGov, neatly wrapped up in one racist, eugenicist package.

Perhaps not entirely by coincidence, the Seventeenth Amendment was ratified in, um, 1913.

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The continuing adventures of Jasmine Tridevil

A year ago, we learned about a Florida woman who claimed to have been surgically altered to add a third breast between the standard two.

I assumed we’d heard the last of her, but it’s not so. That summer she put out a BDSM-oriented music video, shot in the Tampa Bay area where she lives. I don’t think I’ll embed it here, but I admit, I’ve seen racier, and probably so have you. And her voice, or whoever’s dubbed here, isn’t that terrible.

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Perhaps it doesn’t matter

Found on Facebook:

IDGAF Trucking

This operation apparently did at one time exist:

  • Company Name: IDGAF TRUCKING, INC.
  • File Number: 3290868
  • Filing State: New York (NY)
  • Domestic State: Delaware (DE)
  • Filing Status: Inactive — Dissolution By Proclamation / Annulment
  • Filing Date: December 9, 2005
  • Company Age: 10 Years, 8 Months

Sorry to see them go.

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