Misunderestimation

Against the Hornets Wednesday, the Thunder were clumsy early on, but recovered. Against the Kings tonight, they were methodical, but fell to pieces in the second half; it got so bad that Scott Brooks, who’d pulled the starters when OKC was up by a couple of dozen, had to put three of them back in with four minutes left and the lead cut to single digits. The Kings closed to within five, but finally the Thunder put them away, 113-103.

What happened? Two words: “Isaiah Thomas.” The second-year Sacramento guard went on a shooting spree, knocking down 10 of 13 — four of seven from way outside — for a team-high 26 points, and he did it in less than 16 minutes. (Aaron Brooks, who started at the point, had 13 points in 23 minutes.) DeMarcus Cousins, who rattled down ten points in the first quarter, wasn’t a factor thereafter. The Kings shot decently, 45 percent overall, seven of 19 treys, but their rebounders didn’t show up, what with only 29 retrieved, and dimes, at 18, could fairly be characterized as “sparse.”

Especially, you know, when Russell Westbrook can serve up 13 assists by himself, which he did, to offset 4-13 shooting for 13 points. Kevin Durant took up the slack, as he often does, going 10-14 for 31. Serge Ibaka notched another double-double (18 points, 11 rebounds), and Reggie Jackson, the hero of the Hornets game Wednesday, scored — um, zip. Didn’t even take a shot in four minutes. Former King Kevin Martin, who led the bench with 18, was happy to dribble it out at the end.

I suspect that what Scott Brooks is going to want to know is “What happened to our blowout? Have we no defense?” Let’s hope he finds an answer before the Spurs show up on Monday.

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Fark blurb of the week

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Avoiding the fiscal cliff

The lovely and talented E. M. Zanotti, hoping to ward off Complete Financial Collapse, proposes several revenue-enhancement measures:

  • $10 tax everytime someone uses the phrase, “my bad.”
  • 20% penalty tax on anyone who ordered an apple martini after 1998.
  • 40% tax on anyone who buys World Series, Super Bowl, Stanley Cup winners’ merchandise post-facto. Double if Heat or Yankees win.
  • $100 penalty on anyone who uses a Bluetooth earpiece.
  • Tribal tattoo? $30 per year tax. Tramp Stamp? $50. Double if it’s a butterfly.
  • 50% additional income tax on anyone listing their primary occupation as “reality television star.”
  • $1000 penalty for every unnecessarily tinted car window.
  • Immediate institution of the Axe Body Spray Tax.

Read the whole list under the hashtag #emilysfiscalcliffsolutions.

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Anticipation

Your Rebecca Black news for this Friday:

During rehearsal, Rebecca will be doing a LIVE, behind the scenes, chat on her UStream channel. Join her Friday, December 14 at 3:30PM PST to hear all about the rehearsals, her band, her House of Blues Anaheim concert on Sunday, December 23, and up & coming news! She will also be answering your questions in real time.

This will be followed on Monday with:

On Monday, December 17 from 7:00-8:00 PM PST Rebecca will be acoustically performing her new hit single “In Your Words” on AXS TV.

Which my local cable company doesn’t carry. And anyway, the song runs only 3:08, so it shouldn’t take a whole hour, and it won’t: apparently it’s running during the break on AXS’ Inside MMA. (AXS is the channel founded by Mark Cuban, formerly known as HDNet.)

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Dedication to the cause

Nell Hansen, after eleven months without a post, puts up a post:

This is my fourth attempt at blogging. I’m leaving the third one up to serve as a bad example.

Extra points for Zeitgeist grasp.

About a year ago Hansen declared that the Bowl Championship Series is un-American, which strikes me as fairly inarguable.

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Down to thighs

Morgan Freeberg, at what he calls the Hello Kitty of Blogging, offers some advice to those who would entertain us skirtwatchers:

Curves, curves, curves. Visualize your own drumsticks as the article you’d find in a red & white box from KFC, original recipe. Would they have enough lean meat to hold some appeal in that setting? For Marilyn Monroe, Sophia Loren and Raquel Welch, that’d be a yea. Catherine Bach, back in the day, was right on the lower boundary. Any less curve than that, it’s still nice to see, but you’re not doing much to distinguish yourself.

Given KFC’s most distinctive achievement up to now — figuring out a way to carve nine pieces out of a chicken that everybody else sliced up into eight — I’m not entirely sure I’d trust their judgment in this matter.

My own definition of “right on the lower boundary” lands here:

Calvin Klein hosiery ad 2004

This comes perilously close to Extra Crispy.

Oh, and Joe Tex was not available for comment.

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Road-trip notes

For about half a second, I considered labeling this little three-day excursion “World Tour ’12,” but that doesn’t work: too little of the world was actually seen, and the total was a modest 740 miles. Still, a few things come to mind other than the actual purpose of the trip:

  • One of my ex’s besties is sorta hawt. (And definitely taken, but c’est la vie.)
  • Kansas is often mocked for the post-Mad Max terrain beyond the city limits. I demur. There’s a lot to be said for not having fifty gazillion things to look at besides the road.
  • And that goes double for the Flint Hills, which for some reason create the impression that ancient ruminants graze there yet.
  • Even when El Dorado Lake is full, which it isn’t due to the drought, you can still see the lines of trees, growing from the very bottom of the lake. On a sunshiny day like today, it acquires a sort of creepy vibe.
  • I have no idea what the post-ceremony banquet (four courses!) at Cafe Verona might have cost, but it can’t be cheap. It certainly didn’t taste cheap.
  • Never look at a tire when it’s 20 degrees outside.

For those who care: 26.7 mpg, $12 in tolls, 68 emails (49 dismissable). And given the mood of the moment, I felt justified in punctuating the trip home with a stop at Mickey D’s to procure a McRib. For a limited time only, as they say.

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Not that you wanted to know

But this is where the newlyweds ended up last night:

This is Kansas City’s most romantic hotel. Beyond a bed and breakfast, or an inn, each of the hotel’s 62 guest rooms and suites boasts an elaborately themed environment.

Though of course I wouldn’t know this, I am assured that some of these environments are more elaborately themed than others.

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Not even a driblet

What with my daughter getting married and all, I’m not even thinking about basketball tonight.

If I think of something to say about the Hornets/Thunder game, I’ll put it up tomorrow.

Update: OKC 92, New Orleans 88.

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49ers of a sort

Missouri State Missouri’s stretch of US 71 has been redesignated Interstate 49, and there’s a reason why it’s not a continuation of I-29:

The new I-49 was not called I-29 because interstate protocol requires that north-south routes increase in numerical designation from west to east.

“If it were to be named I-29, it would cross I-35 and that would be against the standard naming convention,” said Sean Matlock, transportation project manager in the Joplin office of MoDOT. “Where we are situated in Missouri, it has to be an odd number between I-35 on the west side of the state and I-55 on the east side.”

Remind me not to mention where I-40 and I-44 cross. For that matter, remind me not to mention I-99.

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As the young folk say, THIS

And at this moment, in fact.

Rebecca Denise Hill + Robert Eugene Carson Jr

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Little enough

Okay, they say “My Little Pony.” How little are we talking here?

How about three feet, eight inches?

The Great and Powerful and Life-Size Trixie

This is The Great and Powerful Trixie, as recently sculpted in plush by ~PatNintendoGuy on deviantArt, and it says here that she’s life-size.

In our world, a pony stands 14.2 hands — 58 inches — or less. So “little” would seem to be appropriate. I’m waiting for suitably scaled stallions, who tend to be taller than mares, or (dare I hope?) Princess Celestia or Luna.

Addendum: I seem to have (almost) anticipated this:

“Miss Sparkle, may I have the honor of this dance?”

I’d never seen a pony curtsy before. “Of course you may,” she said, and to my surprise, she planted both front hooves on my shoulders, putting her at an angle where she could look me straight in the eye.

It was a slow dance, okay?

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12/12/12 open thread

I mean, it’s not like we’re going to have a day like this next year.

Possible objective: In the last five open threads, the largest number of comments received has been, um, 12.

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A timely broom

NewsOK.com has revamped its comment system again, this time for quality-assurance purposes:

[F]ar too often in far too many stories, the comments contain vitriolic, hateful and attacking language. Far too often, those comments overwhelm those attempting to have constructive dialogue.

So beginning today, NewsOK is making changes designed to improve the nature and tone of the dialogue for its audience. We’re switching to Facebook commenting, requiring users to login with their Facebook account in order to make a comment on an article.

Facebook, in my experience, is a hair stricter than Disqus. (I’m quite used to both, and I have my real name tied to both, so this bothers me not in the least.)

The ultimate motivation, it appears, is to disperse the crowd of loudmouthed blithering idiots:

We care about the conversation. We care so much about the conversation that we are willing to give up quantity for quality. We expect this change to result in fewer comments on our site. But we also expect this change to encourage more users to participate. And we’re confident that we will see more constructive discourse about issues in Oklahoma.

Why? Because all the comments will be tied to a real person’s Facebook profile, making users accountable for what they post and eliminating the veil of anonymity.

There are, of course, reasons why one might want to remain anonymous on the Net. But commenting on a news site isn’t one of them. (If you aspire to be a whistleblower, you’re going to accomplish more by tweeting a reporter than you will by throwing up a comment.)

And besides, this is the way they do it on Oklahoman.com already, not that anyone ever comments there.

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Decruiting station

Nudism, as an institution, perhaps has passed its shelf date:

[I]t only hinders progress. Because history has shown us that the original goal of nudism has run its course and has impacted society as much as it could. So let’s move on. Let’s not label ourselves with titles that shove us into boxes. Are you gay? Is your entire identity consumed with being attracted to people of the same gender? See? Labels are silly. The same is true with nudism.

In general, it’s not useful to define yourself in terms of any one single characteristic, unless said characteristic is actually how you make a living. But even then, one hopes for something more. An off the cuff, so to speak, interview with Susan Weaver, president of the American Association for Nude Recreation, basically tells me nothing other than that she’s in her early sixties and probably doesn’t have any clothes on right this minute. Of course, that’s all she wanted to say right then — business is business, after all — but it’s an awfully narrow portrait. And shouldn’t she be sitting on a towel? But I digress.

(Nudiarist relayed this without further comment.)

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Perhaps you’d like one of these

Meryl Yourish researches a book, and all sorts of people are looking over her shoulder:

I was trying to find an Egyptian cat pendant in a museum or antiquities collection. I had to use advanced search methods and then some in order not to get results that showed cat pendants in museum stores (or not in museum stores — Google was trying desperately to get me to buy a cat pendant, it seemed).

And if not Google, then who? Amazon, that’s who:

Last night, I ordered a few things on Amazon. And in my “People who bought this would also like” list was — Egyptian cat pendants. The very same links that kept showing up in my search attempts. Clearly, Google and Amazon are trading information.

At least they didn’t get any revenue out of it — this time.

And oh, she was researching for her second book. Here’s the first.

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