Don’t overlook her

For every young, cute, chirpy singer I fixate upon, there are a couple of dozen I manage to miss entirely. One of the latter is Sabrina Carpenter, twenty today, who’s been acting as long as she’s been singing. At 12, she had a teensy role in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit; shortly thereafter, the Disney Channel picked her up for Girl Meets World alongside Rowan Blanchard, and inevitably, she had a single promoted on Radio Disney:

If she comes off here as a younger Meghan Trainor, you will not be surprised to hear that M-Train wrote this one.

Sabrina Carpenter poses in front of a faux-finish wall

Sabrina Carpenter curls up on the sofa

Sabrina Carpenter is about to lose a shoe

Still, she’s ready to shrug off that whole teen-dream image thing:

[A]n “utter and complete transformation” is what Carpenter had been craving — a creative vacation as she was in the midst of crafting her shimmery, dance-driven third studio album, Singular: Act I, released last fall. “I was looking forward to stripping down in every aspect. I wanted to dye my hair for a role. I wanted to be able get into a character in a way where I’d look in the mirror and not even recognize myself. And that’s exactly what I was able do with Nola,” she says. “Ani [Simon-Kennedy, writer-director of The Short History of the Long Road] asked me, “Are you OK with no makeup?’ I was like, ‘Please!’ She asked, ‘Are you OK with not shaving?’ Again, I was like, ‘Please!'”

As Carpenter points out, “This girl, living in a van her whole life with her dad, doesn’t care about her appearance at all. There’s no self-awareness, only an appreciation for what’s going on inside of herself and others. And Nola’s story is one of survival and autonomy, which I think is very empowering for young girls to see.”

That said, Singular: Act II is on the way, containing this song:

In which “chirpy” meets “melancholy.” I promise to start paying attention.

1 comment »

  1. Roger Green »

    12 May 2019 · 7:16 am

    I watched girl meets world from the start, a function of having a young daughter at the time

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